I’ve been dealing with a lot of stress lately and just recently I’ve also made the discovery that mini anxiety attacks on a daily basis caused by nothing at all aren’t exactly normal. I’ve been trying to figure out a way to not only minimize my random anxiety as well as cope better with the stress of everyday life.

Focusing on having a more positive attitude <POSITUDE> has been transforming my days from bleak to joyful. When I wake up I tell myself that today is going to be an awesome day and that I’m really excited for work. Acting like I’m happy eventually turns into me just feeling happy.

Today I watched a Ted Talk called ‘How to make stress your friend’ by Kelly McGonigal. It was extremely interesting and her advice is something I want to put into play right away. Instead of viewing stress as a health hazard she suggests that we view our stress response as a positive reaction. When your heart starts pounding and your breathing quickens view these signs as your body making itself energized as it’s preparing you to meet a challenge. Don’t view your body’s reaction to stress as a bad thing, but instead view these stress indicators as helpful.

Next she talks about Oxytocin and how Oxytocin is actually a stress hormone and is a part of the stress response as much as adrenalin is. When Oxytocin is released it actually helps create resilience by protecting your cardiovascular system from the effects of stress. My favorite part about her talk is finding out that these benefits are enhanced through human connection and contact. “Your stress response has a built in mechanism for stress resilience and that mechanism is human connection” which immediately made me think of my very favorite quote in the world that came from Arch Bishop Desmond Tutu. I’ve left it in my title for your to enjoy.

So caring creates resilience – helping other people and your community is healthy for your body! I love it. And it makes sense.

This-is-Love

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Sometimes… no – MOST times I wake up and I do not want to roll out of bed. At all. It’s the worst part of my day. I’ve always been so envious of morning people. I also wonder if they’re really just aliens or liars, because who in the right mind would voluntarily get up before 8am on a weekend? I’m even giving myself credit here… 8am sounds awful! Am I lazy? Is there something wrong with me? Depressed maybe? Or am I normal?

I have to be honest – I always think that when I reach my best I’ll just naturally become one of those morning people. At my best obviously I’ll be doing hot yoga a few times a week, cardio and gym even more often, eating right, doing more hobbies, stressing less, getting more in touch with my inner self and posting annoying inspirational pictures and messages everyday on my instagram (but when I’m at my best I won’t think they’re annoying, because I’ll be on the same level as those happy and positive morning people!). When I’m at my best, at noon on a Saturday I’ll have already had breakfast, showered and gone to the farmer’s market… not to mention I’ll have a huge chunk of savings in my bank account because being at my best will mean I’m a responsible spender. I’ll hate tv and I won’t be so attached to my phone and internet. At 12:30 on a Saturday you’ll see me drinking herbal tea at a cafe downtown reading the news paper before I have to hurry off to the horse barn. I have constant guilt from not being better, from not being that person I just told you about.

I drive myself crazy with all the anxiety I experieninstagram-inspirationce over not being perfect. I’m not sure how to let it go, but I’m working on it.

I propose that we constantly strive to develop as humans, but never let the end goal be perfection or to be someone else’s picture of perfection. I’ll keep trying to let go of that picture of ‘my best’ so that I can start seeing my own picture of happiness. In the end, what does perfection even really mean? When did happy stop mattering as much as how and what I appear to other people?